Menopause Hair Loss, How To Regain Your Confidence

Menopause Hair Loss, How To Regain Your Confidence

You might have been somewhat prepared for most of the common menopause symptoms, but you may not have expected to experience thinning hair. Despite the fact that menopause is a common cause of hair loss in women, it still takes a lot of us by surprise. So what can we do about it? As you probably know, oestrogen levels decline during menopause, whilst testosterone levels increase. What you may not know, however, is that oestrogen is important for promoting hair growth. This means that as we lose oestrogen, we lose the ability to grow strong, youthful hair. Some areas of your scalp may stop producing hair, whilst the hair that does grow is likely to be thinner than before. The most common type of hair loss following menopause is androgenic alopecia and this is characterised by an overall thinning out of the hair. Many women find the most noticeable areas are  the crown and the frontal area. Some women may experience a receding hair line but most common is a thinning area right at the front which allows the light to shine through to the scalp. If you are a woman who once had very thick and luscious hair, this loss can be very difficult to deal with as suddenly your hair styles don’t seem to work. If you have always had fine or thin hair, the loss can be quite devastating. Very often female hair loss leads to a lack of self-esteem along with a lack of confidence. After combing the internet for possible solutions and even going so far as trying some of the shampoos, lotions and...
Balance Your Hormones Naturally

Balance Your Hormones Naturally

This is a guest post on behalf of Natural Health International by Jan Roberts, Pharmacist, Clinical Nutritionist and Best Selling Author. Looking for something to balance your hormones naturally, instead of introducing them artificially into your body? I’ve found the solution!   Natural solutions are definitely my preference. Unfortunately, when it comes to menopause, most of the natural solutions only help manage hot flashes and night sweats. But what about the mood swings, weight gain, the dryness that affects your sex life, the tossing and turning at night and the constant exhaustion? Sure, there are natural alternatives that might help with each of those problems, but if you’re like me, you have no desire to take six or more products that may or may not work. What’s more, while many supplements may improve symptoms, they’re not addressing the root cause of the issues that affect women around and after menopause – hormone imbalance. In the past, doctors prescribed hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and many of your symptoms would improve. But that was before research showed the potential dangers associated with introducing artificial hormones into your body. But even then, many of your menopause symptoms weren’t only due to loss of hormones, they were due to imbalances between all of your hormones and adding one or two via HRT never fixed all your problems. So I did some research on natural solutions that balance all of your hormones. Did you know that to date there has only been one published clinical trial of a product demonstrating statistically significant effects on hormones in peri and post-menopausal women? That was the product...

NAMS New Position Statement on the use of Hormone Therapy

The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) has published online in the Society’s journal, Menopause (June 2017) a new position statement on the use of hormone therapy (HT) for menopausal and postmenopausal women. Many women are still afraid of taking hormone therapy (HT) despite numerous studies that have taken place since the incorrectly reported findings of the 2002 Women’s Health initiative. This is important information from NAMS and I urge you to read it and also to discuss with your practitioner if this is the path that you wish to take in finding menopause symptom relief. The following information has been extracted directly from the NAMS statement. Dr. JoAnn V. Pinkerton, NAMS Executive Director says, “The use of hormone therapy continues to be one of the most controversial and debated topics. The goal of this updated version of the Society’s position statement is to provide excellent, evidence-based, current clinical recommendations to menopause practitioners for the improvement of care for women depending on them to help relieve menopause symptoms.” The statement also reviews the effects of HT on various health conditions, such as cardiovascular disease and breast cancer, at different stages of a woman’s life. What’s new in the 2017 position statement? The statement expands on and solidifies NAMS’s previous position on several critical areas of confusion regarding HT: • The risks of HT differ for different women, depending on type, dose, duration of use, route of administration, timing of initiation, and whether a progestogen is needed. Treatment should be individualized using the best available evidence to maximize benefits and minimize risks, with periodic reevaluation for the benefits and risks of...

My Therapy’s Hypertension App

This is a guest post by My Therapy who together with Blood Pressure UK have created an infographic which brings together the key statistics and information about hypertension to increase awareness of the serious consequences of untreated high blood pressure. High blood pressure is often considered to be a men’s health problem, but that’s a myth. Women are equally as likely to have high blood pressure, or hypertension as men, and in fact become more likely to develop hypertension than men after they’ve reached the age of 65. Even if you’ve had normal blood pressure most of your life, your chances of developing hypertension increase considerably after menopause. Blood pressure is the force or pressure of blood pushing against the side of blood vessels, and is measured with two numbers. The first number is your systolic blood pressure, it is the highest level your heart pressure reaches when your heart beats, and the second number is your diastolic blood pressure, the lowest level your blood pressure reaches between heart beats. Persistently high blood pressure (140/90mmHg and above) can damage the blood vessels and increase risk of blood clots. While the cause of hypertension is unclear, there are certain risk factors: having a family history of high blood pressure, being overweight, or having a diet high in salt and with a lack of enough fresh fruit and vegetables. Untreated hypertension can lead to increases in the chances of several serious diseases such as heart disease, kidney disease, and vascular dementia, in addition to potentially lethal heart attacks and strokes. The best way to prevent hypertension is to see your doctor...
Rediscover Your Desire Naturally

Rediscover Your Desire Naturally

For many years a woman’s sexual life was taken for granted. Women’s magazines described in detail how to achieve new heights of pleasure, how to be the perfect lover and, more importantly, how all this was really up to women themselves. Considering that not many women like to share details of their sex life with friends, there was little opportunity to question whether these expectations were unachievable and the many women falling short of these standards felt quietly inadequate for years. Sexual satisfaction is the result of many different factors, including psychological ones and the quality of the relationship. Stress can be a major passion killer for both men and women and libido is too often a casualty of too many worries and juggling numerous commitments. The increased use of antidepressants and the contraceptive pill can also negatively affect desire and interest in sex. A time that sees many women losing interest in sex is the menopause. Some women find that their libido seems to dissipate overnight. In some cases it comes back a few months, for some women it never seems quite to get back to the way it used to be, although some women find that, rather than leading to sexual activity, desire seems to grow once they engage in sex. A survey about desire run by Pharma Nord [1] highlights that libido and sexual enjoyment are a problem for a significant amount of women. Nearly 58% of women who took part in the survey revealed that they rarely felt desire and over half felt very dissatisfied with their sex life as a whole. Not surprisingly, half...